SLO-MO SCOMO NET ZERO

The slow crawl of Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison to commit to net zero carbon emissions by 2050 is followed by the government’s coalition partner, led by Deputy Prime Minister, Barnaby Joyce, with no intent to join in.

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/sep/29/climate-pressure-on-scott-morrison-grows-after-nsw-promises-to-cut-emissions-in-half-by-2030

https://theconversation.com/view-from-the-hill-barnaby-joyce-falls-sort-of-into-step-for-the-net-zero-march-168671

https://theconversation.com/no-barnaby-the-uk-energy-crisis-has-nothing-to-do-with-its-net-zero-target-and-to-suggest-otherwise-is-outrageous-168869

https://theconversation.com/the-paris-agreement-at-5-times-running-out-how-to-get-the-world-back-on-track-to-meet-its-climate-goals-151806

This Is Coal…(continued)

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison continues to dismiss setting emissions targets for 2050 after the UN’s IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change).

https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg1/

https://www.theage.com.au/politics/federal/regional-australia-will-not-carry-climate-burden-morrison-says-20210810-p58hi6.html

For visitors outside Australia: –

‘This Is Coal’ refers to when, as Treasurer, Scott Morrison brought a chunk of coal into Parliament celebrating its contribution to the economy, claiming that it won’t hurt you and championing its continued use into the future. : https://www.theguardian.com/global/video/2017/feb/09/scott-morrison-brings-a-chunk-of-coal-into-parliament-video

‘I don’t hold a hose, line refers to when he was apologising in December 2019 for taking holidays in Hawaii, whilst devastating bushfires hit Australia.

Climate change doesn’t cause fires directly but has caused an increase in the occurrence of extreme fire weather and in the length of the fire season across large parts of Australia since the 1950s. In addition to 2019 being the driest year since records began in 1900, it was Australia’s warmest year. In 2019 the annual mean temperature was 1.52 °C above average1.

The impact of climate change has led to longer, more intense fire seasons and an increase in the average number of elevated fire weather days, as measured by the Forest Fire Danger Index (FFDI). Last year saw the highest annual accumulated FFDI on record. (CSIRO)

https://www.csiro.au/en/research/natural-disasters/bushfires/2019-20-bushfires-explainer